Google+ Mom to 2 Posh Lil Divas: Blow It Up! Exploring Gas with Balloons, Baking Soda & Vinegar

Thursday, January 12, 2012

Blow It Up! Exploring Gas with Balloons, Baking Soda & Vinegar

Pin It
The Lil Divas LOVED, LOVED, LOVED 
they also adore balloons (I always have to keep some on hand)
so I knew they would get a kick out of this one!

Exploring Gas w/Balloons, Baking Soda & Vinegar


What You Need:
baking soda
vinegar
plastic bottle
balloon
funnels (we used 2)


What To Do:
1. Using your funnel pour vinegar into your bottle.


You only need to fill about 1/3 of the bottle.


2. Using another (dry) funnel pour baking soda into your balloon.
Fill the balloon approx. 1/2 way.


3. Cover the top of the bottle with you balloon.
Make sure you don't let the baking soda spill into the bottle prematurely.


4. When ready, lift your balloon and let the baking soda fall into the vinegar.


5. Watch as the mixture fizzes, bubbles & expands your balloon!


6. Discuss how the baking soda & vinegar produce a gas which fills the balloon.


7. Repeat! Believe me, your kids will want to do this more than once.

It was lots of fun for the Lil Divas to watch the ingredients combine


and form a reaction that was so visual - blowing up the balloon.


FUN! 


The science behind it - Baking soda and the vinegar create an ACID-BASE reaction. When combined/mixed they create a gas - carbon dioxide. Gasses need room to spread, so the carbon dioxide fills the bottle and then moves into the balloon inflating it.

** Due to lots of comments left below I feel the need to add (for clarity) that this does NOT produce helium. Carbon Dioxide gas will inflate the balloons but they do not "fly" like helium inflated balloons as it is not the same kind of gas. This is meant to be a fun science experiment/demonstration. **

Go ahead have fun inflating some balloons!
Bern

If you enjoyed this post be sure to check out our other science explorations

I'd love to connect on Facebook, Twitter and G+!

167 comments:

  1. Another easy science experiment we haven't tried yet. Thanks for the reminder!

    Brittney
    www.moms-heart.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  2. Love this easy idea! We might just try this today since we had to cancel our other plans. Also, I shared it on Facebook too.

    Mommy Cameron | Raising the Cameron Clan

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. thanks so much for sharing it on FB. I hope you had fun with it!

      Delete
    2. i think your web site is awsome im in 6th grade and needed a sience project you helped alot thanks! :)

      Delete
  3. Thanks for this! My kids will love it. We loved the other experiment mixing the baking soda & vinegar with food coloring.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. isn't baking soda & vinegar GREAT?! So much more you can do - I could have done a week of just that - maybe I might in the future! My girls LOVED all the fun things we did over the past 2 weeks.

      Delete
    2. vinegar and baking soda are AMAZING!!I drink it 3 x's a day and also use for cleaning,homemade fabric softner,etc...........

      Delete
    3. Michelle why do you drink baking soda and vinegar if it produces carbon dioxide? Is this some sort of home remedy for something just curious.

      Delete
    4. yeah i don't get how you would want to drink it either LOL x3 i guess people have their opinions on what the drink....

      Delete
    5. i totaly agree!

      Delete
  4. A brilliant experiment!

    Thanks for sharing on Kids Get Crafty!

    Maggy

    ReplyDelete
  5. I know somebody who loves baking soda and vinegar! We are definitely going to try it. Blowing balloons is my daughters fav. too!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Esther - I have had to re-stock our supply! The girls can't get enough! :)

      Delete
  6. Awesome. We did this very experiment this week. Then we made a volcano. We also filled one balloon with air, and the other with carbon dioxide and dropped them at the same time to see which one was denser / heavier. A nice add on.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. oh, I like the add-ons! thanks for sharing. We made a simple volcano too - they loved that.

      Delete
    2. Just a note from a former middle school science teacher: Heavier things don't fall any faster than lighter things. Laws of physics are often baffling! If you want to test to see which is heavier, you can tape each balloon to the end of a yard stick, suspend the yardstick by a piece of string in the exact middle, (creating a simple balance scale) and see which goes down further.

      Delete
    3. Good catch. I read the above comment and thought "I remember something about that from high school..."

      Delete
    4. Just a note from an engineer to the former middle school science teacher....

      Recall the hammer and feather experiment done on the moon. This illustrates that the acceleration due to gravity is the same regardless of the mass of the object. So, they should fall at the same rate. They did this on the moon because there is no atmosphere to interfere with the experiment.

      In this case the laws concerning buoyancy come into play and must be considered. Assuming equal volume displacement, the balloon filled with air is almost neutrally buoyant with respect to the atmosphere whereas the balloon filled with the more dense carbon dioxide is less buoyant. Given these conditions a CO2 balloon would sink faster due to its buoyancy, not its mass.

      Delete
    5. this sounds like tons of fun. how did you create the volcano??

      Delete
  7. have had this on our "to do" list for homeschool for a while now...thanks for the reminder! Great job! Always love your blog!

    Melissa
    The Joys of Home Educating

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. thanks for the sweet comment! :) We love having you with us.

      Delete
    2. Hello there, I have a party coming up soon, is it possible to do this the day before the party? or will the balloons burst by the next day??

      Delete
  8. This is great! Would you please share this with our readers for Fun Stuff Fridays? http://www.toysinthedryer.com/2012/01/fun-stuff-fridays-6.html

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. i want to know after blown up does it reall burns in air

      Delete
  9. I keep meaning to try this experiment but we never buy soda! I'll have to make an exception (to the kids' probable delight) so we can give it a shot.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think the pic shows BAKING SODA not cola soda!!! am I wrong???

      Delete
    2. Yes It is BAKING SODA!!!! Vinegar and Sprite would just make a NASTY drink.

      Delete
    3. I'm sure she meant buy soda for the bottles used not in place of bakin soda!

      Delete
    4. No need to buy a soda bottle. The bottle in the pictures looks like a plain old water bottle to me! And don't forget to recycle!

      Delete
  10. THis is sooooo cool!! What a simple, fun experiment!! We are going to try this this week!! Thanks for linking up to TGIF! See you next week,
    Beth =-)

    ReplyDelete
  11. Anything with baking soda and vinegar is fun! Thanks for linking to Science Sunday!

    ReplyDelete
  12. When I tried this it didn't blow up nearly so well! Thanks for linking to Fun Sparks. x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Baking soda can lose effectiveness with age. Always try to use fresh baking soda for science experiments and baking of course! Older soda is awesome to keep on the kitchen sink for scouring pots and pans because even if it has list its fizz factor, it still is abrasive enough to polish metal!

      Delete
  13. I just wanted to let you know I featured this at TGIF Linky Party here - http://livinglifeintentionally.blogspot.com/2012/01/tgif-linky-party-13.html - As this is your 2nd feature I have a special button for you!! Email me at livinglifeintentionallyblog @gmail.com to get the code =-) Thanks for sharing your creativing with all of us!!
    Beth =)

    ReplyDelete
  14. Can't wait to try this! Do they fly like helium ballons?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No, Carbon Dioxide is produced by the baking soda/vinegar reaction and is not lighter than air.

      Delete
    2. Denser, please not lighter.

      Delete
    3. Actually atomic weight wise, it is not lighter than air. So the helpful comment was in no way incorrect. The word dense does not need to be used, Anonymous #2. Also if you are going to nit-pick a reply, make sure your own reply uses punctuation correctly. :)

      Delete
    4. LOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Reading these is hilarious! (just had to say it)

      Delete
  15. I just want you to know that I teach preschool and we have done a ton of your experiments and our kids LOVE them!!! Thank you so much for posting. I enjoy them as much as the kids :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Christie,

      YAY! Your comment has made my day! I love to hear that others are having fun experimenting and have been inspired by our little posts. :)

      Delete
  16. I can't wait to share this with my kids next week. They'll get a big kick out if it for sure. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  17. This looks really fun! We're about to try it. Thanks for sharing your great ideas!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  18. This looks like it would be right up my grandsons alley. This combination is also a great drain cleaner.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That´s good to know that it´s also a great drain cleaner - then it has a double use as a science experiment and a cleaner. Thanks for sharing.

      Delete
  19. How long will these stay inflated?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Unfortunately, I can't give you a specific/definite answer. We inflated our balloons for the purpose of the experiment/demonstration. My girls played with the balloons that day and inevitably popped them. We did not use them as decoration so they weren't around long enough for me to know how much time they would remain full of air. Sorry I can't be of more help.

      Delete
  20. I was wondering the same thing.

    ReplyDelete
  21. As was I since I am preparing for a party and having a hard time finding a helium tank big enough to fill my tall order.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This doesn't make balloons fly like helium....so don't plan on this and then be stuck on party day in a pinch!!

      Delete
  22. A great alternative to use when you can't use helium due to being allergic to it as I am!
    How many balloons does it blow up ?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This does not make balloons fly like helium.

      Delete
    2. Correct, this makes carbon dioxide gas as stated not helium.

      Delete
  23. Great new idea for an old trick!! My son will love it and it's much safer than the 'rocket' we have.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Neat. Can't wait to try this.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Very cool! I might have to try this. You said it creates an Acid Base, is that dangerous if it spills?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No, it's just vinegar and baking soda which is used to clean things so spills are easy to wipe up and it won't "burn" through - just lots of fizz.

      Delete
    2. Excellent! thanks, this looks like it'll be a lot of fun for my 3.5 year old, and at least fun for my 19month to watch :).. I just pinned this on Pinterest too :)

      Delete
    3. The acid-base reaction is between the vinegar (acetic acid) and sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) which is a base. The products are neutralized; carbon dioxide and sodium acetate. Very harmless products.

      Delete
  26. We just formed a volcano to set off later this week. I saw this and was so excited that we can do this to show the gas that the vinegar and baking soda mixture creates!! Sooo cool! My girls love playing with balloons too so I know they will be super excited to see this!!! Thanks for sharing. :)

    ReplyDelete
  27. An extension for this activity could be to take the carbon dioxide gas from the balloon and use it to extinguish a candle flame. You could discuss the three necessary parts to have a fire and how many fire extinguishers utilize carbon dioxide to put out fires.

    ReplyDelete
  28. Love it thanks for sharing!!!

    ReplyDelete
  29. I love this! I really love that you do this with your girls. I sometimes notice that moms with girls shy away from science activities (probably not even on purpose). So great!

    ReplyDelete
  30. How long do the balloons stay in the air?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Never mind I read more above to see they don't actually float

      Delete
  31. Careful with this one. Don't let the kids try inhaling the CO2 as they would helium.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for your concern. Of course as with any experiments, adults should always supervise. My daughters are always closely supervised as we do all of our experimenting together.

      Delete
  32. Do you kids a favor and discuss how this creates CO2 and not helium!
    CO2 is a dense gas, which means it will sink to the floor/ground.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, we did discuss how this combination of vinegar and baking soda creates carbon dioxide (it is in the post above). The great thing was that they experienced firsthand that the balloons do not float like helium filled balloons do! It is a very hands-on and visual experiment which is great! Thank you.

      Delete
  33. Good idea -- my son would love this! He absolutely loves creating a "volcano" w/baking soda and vinegar. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  34. cool we did a project similar

    ReplyDelete
  35. This is so great,and my little people will love it!

    ReplyDelete
  36. Carbon dioxide is about 11 times heavier than helium, so not only will these NOT float, they tend to stay down. But that by itself is a kind of cool science idea to "float"-- not all gases are the same

    ReplyDelete
  37. do they float?

    ReplyDelete
  38. My daughter's first sleepover is scheduled for 2 weeks from now. I think this'll be a really fun activity for them to do together (need to keep 'em busy) and then they can decorate her bedroom! So the guests can be the decorating committees!
    Awesome.idea says Greatful.mom!
    Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  39. When I did this, the balloon only expanded to a certain point; it did not expand very far. Do you know what when wrong? I put the baking soda in the balloon; how much exactly do I put?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The reaction just completed before your balloon was full. When the balloon stopped inflating, there was probably vinegar left in the bottle, but no baking soda, right? Just add more baking soda to the balloon next time. It's trial and error to get it right.
      Good luck!

      Delete
  40. Thank you for taking the time to share.

    ReplyDelete
  41. THAT IS GOLD!!! You are an absolute super star!!! Thanks for making our school holidays such fun with your goo and now helium balloons xx Dani

    ReplyDelete
  42. Dropping menthos into a bottle of coke is fun too - but a bit messier.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. that has been on my to do list with the girls for a long time now! :) I really need to get some menthos!

      Delete
  43. So cute!

    I’d love it if you shared this with the Fun Family Crafts audience.
    FFC is similar to Craftgawker but it only features kid friendly tutorials.

    Looking forward to seeing what fun crafts you submit!
    http://funfamilycrafts.com

    ReplyDelete
  44. This was really fun, we loved it, thanks

    ReplyDelete
  45. I'm actually thinking about using this for a mosquito trap...

    ReplyDelete
  46. Another add on would be to:
    1. release the gas from the balloon into a glass or jar
    2. light a candle
    3. "pour" the gas from the glass or jar over the candle flame
    4. see what happens!
    Fire needs oxygen to burn. The carbon dioxide from the balloon smothers the candle and doesn't allow any oxygen to get to the flame and puts it out.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. this sounds interesting! I will have to test it out! Thanks for sharing.

      Delete
  47. How long do the balloons last once they are blown up?

    ReplyDelete
  48. That's like dropping a Altos mint into a 2 liter coke!! Hint!!! Do it outside!! Lol

    ReplyDelete
  49. I did this with my girl guide unit. It was fantastic, since the balloon exploded covering me in a baking soda vinegar mess. Man did they love that!

    ReplyDelete
  50. Some dummy pinned this on Pinterest with a description that leads people to believe this is a replacement for helium instead of a cute science experiment for kids.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. sorry about that Aaron. I keep replying trying to clear it up but it's gotten impossible. :( I never mentioned helium as it was not what we were doing but pinterest has made it take on a life of its own.

      Delete
    2. After sitting here reading all the comments and now doubled over laughing at how many people ask about the helium balloons, I am relieved to read this explanation. I had almost lost all faith in humanity...

      Delete
  51. Fun Idea. Baking soda and vinegar make an awesome household cleaner/stain remover. Works so much better at removing stains, soap scum, oder, etc. than store bought cleaners. So dump it in a spray bottle and use it around the house after your experiement.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sodium acetate is all that’s left over from a complete reaction of baking soda and vinegar. Although sodium acetate has many uses, a cleaning agent isn’t one of them.

      Vinegar and baking soda are good safe alternatives for cleaning, but there is no point in mixing them. They will just use each other up in the chemical reaction. Used separately they can compete with store bought chemicals, although it can be argued that they don’t necessarily perform better. Cheap and safe, sure…

      Delete
  52. This is a fun experiment. Please link this to Artsy Play Wednesday on Capri + 3. The linky is now open. If you miss it, a new one will open on Wednesday. I hope to see you there.

    : 0 ) Theresa
    http://www.multiples-mom.com

    ReplyDelete
  53. Planning a wedding. Do you know how many balloons one mix/bottle will make?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. These will not float (this is a recording...)

      Delete
  54. This is a fun experiment that I have done lots of times! Check out more experiments at our Norwegian experiment blog: http://blog.kunnskapsloypa.no! :-)

    ReplyDelete
  55. ohh i thought it's gonna fly/float like helium do. thanks for the disclaimer.

    ReplyDelete
  56. nice!!!!!!! its very easy and fun just finished it !!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  57. Does it really float in the air?

    ReplyDelete
  58. CAN YOU BLOW UP A BALLOON WITH A BIKE AIR PUMP? JUST WANTING TO KNO

    ReplyDelete
  59. How many balloons with this air up?

    ReplyDelete
  60. I 'm sorry if this is a silly question, but what sizs of baloon do you use? I have some small ones that I'm not sure will work.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. regular sized balloons is what I used, not mini ones since they have to fit over the mouth/opening of the bottle.

      Delete
    2. I Just (5min ago) used the mini ones and they fit right and it worked.

      Delete
    3. thanks for sharing your experience with us. Glad they worked for you.

      Delete
  61. You are so wonderfully patient with all the people who thought they were going to float. You must be a very nice person.

    ReplyDelete
  62. We have tried this and the girls loved it! We tried it with pop rocks and pop too! http://lifewithmoorebabies.blogspot.com/2012/06/pop-rocks-science.html

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. that sounds fun! I have never tried it with pop rocks before

      Delete
  63. Bern - I added this on my Spooktacular Smorgasbord of Science & Sensory Ideas - hope that is okay. It is fantastic. http://kindergartenbasics.blogspot.com/2012/10/spooktacular-smorgasboard-of-simple.html

    ReplyDelete
  64. This pin idea is not that safe. It creates hydrogen gas to fill the balloon. Remember the Hindenburg? We traded Hydrogen for Helium which is much safer. I wouldn't use this at a party!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. OMG, some of these comments are so funny. Do people even read? I cant stop giggling about this one.
      ~Jamie

      Delete
    2. Carbon dioxide is produced, completely harmless. Same thing that's in pop can's and pop machines that your obese and diabetic kids are drinking

      Delete
  65. One question, after you've inflated a balloon, and you're ready to inflate another one, do you pour the old mixture out and start over with the 1/3 bottle of vinegar, or can you leave that part in there and just refill the next balloon with more baking soda. (Sorry if you answered this already)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. we just added more baking soda but after awhile I found that the reaction is not as pronounced and it is best to start fresh with a new batch of everything.

      Delete
  66. Awesome idea!!! I think its a great one to use at parties, seeing as I just use balloons to pin up & decorate, not float. It'd b something all the kids could get in on BEFORE the party was to start, & that would get my decorating done for me!!! Lol...I have 6 kids (which equals 6 bday parties annually) ....always looking for something fun for them that makes my life easier!!!!


    Also...some people need to read before they post!!!! I read about 20 comments asking if it floats...seriously????? Read the instructions!!!!! If that doesn't work for u, its in with the first couple of comments! Jeez!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dont be mean it is not their fualt that they do not understand the instructions and what not... you could use them to decorate but THEY DO NOT FLOAT!!!! you need helium to make the balloons float. ;^)

      Delete
    2. Hahaha! I too could not help shaking my head and giggling at the 'how long do they float' comments, and the hydrogen gas comment? Oh my gosh, ignorance like that highlights precisely why we need to expose children to consistent and accurate lessons in science! I am a preschool teacher and my co-teacher and I were blowing up balloons for a birthday party for another coworker and she asks, "why aren't they floating?" I thought she was kidding until I saw her tossing them in the air and frowning when they didn't stay! Needless to say I started adding more science activities to my lesson plans that very day for the kids and for her benefit as well!

      Delete
  67. I liked the pictures of those two little girls and i actually did this experiment about two days ago in my chemistry class. It was fun except that some of my friends did not help me with the experiment. -_- :^\

    ReplyDelete
  68. The pictures are cute and i wanted to ask if this was a high school experiment or a middle school experiment???? :^|

    ReplyDelete
  69. I love this experiment and i also love FRIED CHIKEN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :)

    ReplyDelete
  70. omg luv it you guys are so cray cray >3 omg omg !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. i know luv it also omg fantastic !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!>3

      Delete
  71. Awesome! Hurricane Sandy is on her way to our house, this will be fun for when the power goes out!

    ReplyDelete
  72. My son did a similar experiment for his science fair project, however we did it with pop rocks and different carbonated beverages. (He was in the fifth grade so they asked us to make the project a little more advanced.) We used cola, diet cola, plain soda, and water (as a control). We made sure there were equal amounts of liquid in each bottle (10 oz i think) and put the entire packet of the pop rocks into the balloon. After 3 minutes we measured th balloons. I won't tell the results so that your kids can figure it out themselves. My son came in third place out of the entire school (and got an A)!

    ReplyDelete
  73. thouht this will create hydrogen

    ReplyDelete
  74. I think a lot of the confusion about weather or not they will float like helium is because people were pinning it on pinterest and saying you don't need helium if you do this! Well... not all of us are scientificly inclined and don't know gasses n junk.

    ReplyDelete
  75. I did this experiment with my babysitting kids (ages 3 and 1). It was great fun for them as well as me!! I'm posting this on my blog, www.kidscreateabooks.blogspot.com also, to share the fun with my readers!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sheila, I am so glad you enjoyed the activity. Isn't it simple but fun!? Awesome!!!

      Delete
  76. I am so glad that I stumbled upon your blog tonight. I am teaching Matter this week and this experiment will fit in perfectly for tomorrow as we will be focusing on the molecular properties of gas. YAY!!!!!! They will see it in action and I am forwarding this to a friend who is teaching on Matter as well. Yes I'm excited. LOL My husband and I created a song on solids, liquids and gas that may be helpful to your home school. I hope so. You can find it at
    http://www.mommytheteacher.com/2013/01/first-official-week-back.html

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Steph,

      Thanks for sharing your blog and the matter song with me. I am so glad you found us and that the experiment will be useful. Be sure to let me know how it goes.

      Delete
  77. This project is creative and easy. My dad thinks its cool to make a balloon to blow up by using baking soda and vinegar. Children like me love to blow up things, so this is a wonderful project. Plus your daugthers are so cute.

    ReplyDelete
  78. Thanks for this cool expirement! I did it for my Science Fair project. It is really fun and cool :)

    ReplyDelete
  79. does this work with water balloons

    ReplyDelete
  80. I tried this for my nephews birthday party, it blew it up, but it didnt blow up very big =/ Maybe I didnt have enough baking soda in mine or something, but after an hour or 2, it had done deflated to the size of my palm!

    ReplyDelete
  81. This is an amazing project ima use it when i go to the science fair :3
    *flies away happily*

    ReplyDelete
  82. what makes the ballon stop bloing up?
    why does the reaction end?

    ReplyDelete
  83. how long does the balloon stay blown up?

    ReplyDelete
  84. What can be an easy hypothesis for this experiment?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You need to come up with a question before someone can help you with the hypothesis. What the blogger did here was a demonstration or model, not an experiment (NOT something you'd do for the Science Fair). For an experiment (or Science Fair Project), you need variables (things that change). For example, if you were going to turn this into an experiment, you could ask "Does changing the temperature of vinegar affect the rate at which a balloon is filled with carbon dioxide?" A good rule of thumb is to come up with 3 predictions based on your question, then from those predictions, your hypothesis will be the one you think will most likely occur.

      Delete
  85. I THINK THIS IS AWESOME SCIENCE FAIR PROJECT AND I KNOW IM GOING TO USE IT

    ReplyDelete
  86. Trying this out today, with my 3 year old daughter, and 1 year old son......can't wait to see their faces:) We've been playing with baking soda and vinegar a lot lately. We all love it!

    ReplyDelete
  87. A great way to get kids interested in science. My son loves science and I can't wait to have him do this experiment and some of the variations introduced here. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  88. Sounds like a great idea. I'm throwing a baby shower but wondering how long will the balloons last?

    ReplyDelete
  89. how long do these balloons stay inflated?

    ReplyDelete
  90. i love ur the best it help my daughter with her science project

    ReplyDelete
  91. Informative read. Should be able to save up quite a bit of effort and breathes. Do you know roughly how much of gas does it produce? Do you have a rough chart of what's the ratio of Gas to baking soda?

    ReplyDelete
  92. 1/3 cup of baking soda or washing soda down a drain, followed by 1/3 cup of vinegar makes the best drain cleaner you can use. Repeat 3 or 4 times in one week for slow drains, until the drain is cleared of clogs, then clean them once or twice a month. No more expensive cleaners needed! I went through $15 -$20 worth of commercial cleaners and my shower drain was still too slow, but 3 applications of this concoction has it totally clean and draining better than it ever has in the 10 years we've owned this house!

    ReplyDelete
  93. This was an awesome rainy day at home with pink eye science experiment! My 6-yr old LOVED it!

    ReplyDelete
  94. This is so helpful for children that struggle to blow up a balloon on their own. Thank you so much I have not tried this yet but from what you shared it looks very fun. Like you state it is visually engaging for children to experiment with this new way blowing up balloons.

    ReplyDelete
  95. My boss is leaving my company this Friday. Every year we do something crazy for her office. So for her last day we are going to do everything we have ever done on her last day. So one year we filled her entire office with balloons. We blew everyone of them up! My question for you is...With the amount of soda and vinegar in that small bottle you used about how many regular sized balloons could you blow up before you had to pour out the mixture and start over?

    ReplyDelete
  96. This was posted on FB again by another blogger that linked to your site. I think it's wonderful that you do science experiments with your daughters. I used to teach 2nd grade so I'm going to check out more of your blog. Thanks for showing that science can be fun.

    ReplyDelete
  97. Wow! My children were so excited and this one is a very easy experiment.Thank you!!

    ReplyDelete
  98. What is baking soda?? (I am from holland)

    ReplyDelete
  99. Can you do this for birthday parties? How long do these balloons stay up?

    ReplyDelete
  100. Thank this is cool, we are getting ready for a birthday party and this will fit right into it nothing better than being able to teach kids with out them even knowing it learning while having tons of fun nothing better

    ReplyDelete
  101. I'm delighted to mature so additional functional and informative collection on your web site.
    bubblegum casting reviews

    ReplyDelete
  102. Hi Dear, have you been certainly visiting this site daily, if that's the case you then will certainly get good knowledge.
    bubblegum casting reviews

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for taking the time to visit Mom to 2 Posh Lil Divas! I hope you will stay awhile to explore all we have to offer!